FUTURE VEDL Accounting Policy

1 Company overview


Vedanta Limited (formerly known as Sesa Sterlite Limited), ‘Vedanta’ or the ‘Company’ is a public limited Company domiciled in India and has its registered office at 1st Floor, ‘C’ wing, Unit 103, Corporate Avenue, Atul Projects, Chakala, Andheri (East), Mumbai-400093, Maharashtra. Vedanta’s equity shares are listed on National Stock Exchange and Bombay Stock Exchange in India and its American depository shares (“ADS”) are listed on New York Stock Exchange in United States of America. Each ADS represents four equity shares. Vedanta is majorly-owned by and is a controlled subsidiary of Vedanta Resources Plc, the London listed diversified natural resource Company.


The Company is principally engaged in the business of exploration, production and sale of aluminium, iron ore, copper, commercial power and oil and gas.


The Company’s aluminium business (Jharsuguda aluminium) principally consists of production of 2.0 mtpa alumina at Lanjigarh, Odisha, production of 0.5 mtpa aluminium at Jharsuguda, Odisha and captive power plants situated at Jharsuguda & Lanjigarh. The Company is also setting up a 1.25 mtpa aluminium smelter at Jharsuguda, 4.0 mtpa of alumina refinery at Lanjigarh and 210 MW power plant at Lanjigarh.


The Company’s iron ore business (Iron ore) consist of iron ore exploration, mining, beneficiation and exports. Vedanta has iron ore mining operations in the States of Goa and Karnataka. Vedanta is also in the business of manufacturing pig iron and metallurgical coke.


The Company’s copper business (Copper India) principally consists of custom smelting and includes a copper smelter, a refinery, a phosphoric acid plant and power plants at Tuticorin, Tamilnadu and a refinery and two copper rod plants at Silvassa in the Union Territory of Dadra and Nagar Haveli.


The Company’s power business comprise of 600 MW thermal coal based power facility in the State of Odisha.


The Company’s oil and gas business is engaged in surveying, prospecting, drilling, exploring, acquiring, developing, producing, transporting, marketing, distributing and generally dealing in minerals, oils, petroleum, gas and related by-products and other activities incidental to the same. As part of its business activities, the Company also holds interests in its subsidiary companies which have been granted rights to explore and develop oil and gas exploration blocks. The oil and gas business largely operates in the state of Gujarat, Rajasthan and Andhra Pradesh. (Refer note 4).


These are the Company’s separate financial statements.


The details of Company’s material subsidiaries, associates and joint ventures are given in note 46.


2 Basis of preparation of financial statements


(a) Basis of preparation and Compliance with Ind AS


For all periods upto and including the year ended March 31, 2016, the Company had prepared its financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) in India and complied with the accounting standards (Previous GAAP) as notified under Section 133 of the Companies Act, 2013 read together with Rule 7 of the Companies (Accounts) Rules, 2014, to the extent applicable, and the presentation requirements of the Companies Act, 2013.


Pursuant to the notification dated February 16, 2015, issued by the Ministry of Corporate Affairs, the Company has adopted Indian Accounting Standards notified under Section 133 read with Rule 4A of the Companies (Indian Accounting Standards) Rules, 2015, Companies (Indian Accounting Standards) (Amendment) Rules, 2016 as amended and the relevant provisions of the Companies Act, 2013 (collectively, “Ind AS”) with effect from April 1, 2016 and the Company is required to prepare its financial statements in accordance with Ind AS for the year ended March 31, 2017. These financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2017 are the first financial statements the company has prepared in accordance with Ind AS.


The transition to Ind AS was carried out in accordance with Ind AS 101 First- Time Adoption of Indian Accounting Standards with the date of transition as April 01, 2015. Refer note 55 for descriptions of the effect of the transition and reconciliations required as per Ind AS 101.


These financial statements are approved for issue by the Board of Directors on May 15, 2017.


(b) Basis of measurement


The financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis using historical cost convention and on an accrual method of accounting, except for certain financial assets and liabilities which are measured at fair value/amortised cost (Refer note 3(i) below).


3 Significant accounting policies


The Company has applied the following accounting policies to all periods presented in the financial statements.


(a) Functional and presentation currency


The financial statements are prepared in Indian Rupees, which is the Company’s presentation Currency and the functional currency for all its operations except for oil and gas operations which has a US Dollar functional currency. All financial information presented in Indian Rupees has been rounded to the nearest Crore with two decimal places, unless stated otherwise.


(b) Current and non-current classification


The Company presents assets and liabilities in the balance sheet based on current / non-current classification.


An asset is classified as current when it satisfies any of the following criteria:


- it is expected to be realized in, or is intended for sale or consumption in, the Company’s normal operating cycle.


- it is held primarily for the purpose of being traded;


- it is expected to be realized within 12 months after the reporting date; or


- it is cash or cash equivalent unless it is restricted from being exchanged or used to settle a liability for at least 12 months after the reporting date.


All other assets are classified as non-current.


A liability is classified as current when it satisfies any of the following criteria:


- it is expected to be settled in the Company’s normal operating cycle;


- it is held primarily for the purpose of being traded;


- it is due to be settled within 12 months after the reporting date; or


- the Company does not have an unconditional right to defer settlement of the liability for at least 12 months after the reporting date. Terms of a liability that could, at the option of the counterparty, result in its settlement by the issue of equity instruments do not affect its classification.


All other liabilities are classified as non-current.


Deferred tax assets and liabilities are classified as non current only.


(c) Revenue recognition


Revenues are measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable, net of discounts, volume rebates, outgoing sales taxes and other indirect taxes excluding excise duty.


Excise duty is a liability of the manufacturer which forms part of the cost of production, irrespective of whether the goods are sold or not. Since the recovery of excise duty flows to Company on its own account, revenue includes excise duty


Sale of goods


Revenues from sales of goods are recognised when all significant risks and rewards of ownership of the commodity sold are transferred to the customer which usually is on delivery of the commodity to the shipping agent. Revenues from sale of by-products are included in revenue.


Certain of the Company’s sales contracts provide for provisional pricing based on the price on The London Metal Exchange (“LME”), as specified in the contract, when shipped. Final settlement of the price is based on the applicable price for a specified future period. The company’s provisionally priced sales are marked to market using the relevant forward prices for the future period specified in the contract and is adjusted in revenue.


Revenue from oil, gas and condensate sales represents the Company’s share (net of Government’s share of profit petroleum) of oil, gas and condensate production, recognized on a direct entitlement basis, when significant risks and rewards of ownership are transferred to the buyers. Government’s share of profit petroleum is accounted for when the obligation (legal or constructive), in respect of the same arises.


Revenue from sale of power is recognised when delivered and measured based on rates as per bilateral contractual agreements with buyers and at rate arrived at based on the principles laid down under the relevant Tariff Regulations as notified by the regulatory bodies, as applicable.


Revenue from rendering of services is recognised on the basis of work performed. .


Interest income


Interest income from debt instruments is recognised using the effective interest rate method. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial asset to the gross carrying amount of a financial asset. When calculating the effective interest rate, the Company estimates the expected cash flows by considering all the contractual terms of the financial instrument (for example, prepayment, extension, call and similar options) but does not consider the expected credit losses.


Dividends


Dividend income is recognised in the statement of profit and loss only when the right to receive payment is established, provided it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the dividend will flow to the Company, and the amount of the dividend can be measured reliably.


(d) Property, plant and equipment


(i) Mining properties


The costs of mining properties, which include the costs of acquiring and developing mining properties and mineral rights, are capitalised as property, plant and equipment under the heading “Mining properties” in the year in which they are incurred.


When a decision is taken that a mining property is viable for commercial production (i.e. when the company determines that the mining property will provide sufficient and sustainable return relative to the risks and the company decided to proceed with the mine development), all further pre-production primary development expenditure other than land, buildings, plant and equipment is capitalised as part of the cost of the mining property until the mining property is capable of commercial production.


Exploration and evaluation assets are recognized as assets at their cost of acquisition, subject to meeting the commercial production criteria as above and are subject to impairment review on annual basis, or more frequently if indicators of impairment exist.


The stripping cost incurred during the production phase of a surface mine is deferred to the extent the current period stripping cost exceeds the average period stripping cost over the life of mine and recognised as an asset if such cost provides a benefit in terms of improved access to ore in future periods and certain criteria are met. When the benefit from the stripping costs are realised in the current period, the stripping costs are accounted for as the cost of inventory. If the costs of inventory produced and the stripping activity asset are not separately identifiable, a relevant production measure is used to allocate the production stripping costs between the inventory produced and the stripping activity asset. The Company uses the expected volume of waste compared with the actual volume of waste extracted for a given value of ore production for the purpose of determining the cost of the stripping activity asset.


Deferred stripping cost are included in mining properties within property, plant and equipment and disclosed as a part of mining properties. After initial recognition, the stripping activity asset is depreciated on a unit of production method over the expected useful life of the identified component of the ore body.


In circumstance, where a property is abandoned, the cumulative capitalized costs relating to the property are written off in the same period.


Commercial reserves are proved and probable reserves. Changes in the commercial reserves affecting unit of production calculations are dealt with prospectively over the revised remaining reserves.


(ii) Oil and gas assets- (developing/producing assets)


For oil and gas assets a successful efforts based accounting policy is followed. Costs incurred prior to obtaining the legal rights to explore an area are expensed immediately to the statements of profit and loss.


All costs incurred after the technical feasibility and commercial viability of producing hydrocarbons has been demonstrated are capitalised within property, plant and equipment - development/producing assets on a field-by-field basis. Subsequent expenditure is capitalised only where it either enhances the economic benefits of the development/producing asset or replaces part of the existing development/producing asset. Any remaining costs associated with the part replaced are expensed.


Net proceeds from any disposal of development/ producing assets are credited against the previously capitalised cost. A gain or loss on disposal of a development/producing asset is recognised in the statements of profit and loss to the extent that the net proceeds exceed or are less than the appropriate portion of the net capitalised costs of the asset.


(iii) Other property, plant and equipment


The initial cost of property, plant and equipment comprises its purchase price, including import duties and non-refundable purchase taxes, and any directly attributable costs of bringing an asset to working condition and location for its intended use. It also includes the initial estimate of the costs of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located. Items such as spares are capitalized when they meet the definition of property, plant and equipment.


If significant parts of an item of property, plant and equipment have different useful lives, then they are accounted for as separate items (major components) of property, plant and equipment. Likewise, expenditure towards major inspections and overhauls are identified as a separate component and depreciated over the expected period till the next overhaul expenditure.


Land acquired free of cost or at below market rate from the government is recognized at fair value with corresponding credit to deferred income.


On transition to Ind AS, the Company has elected to use the fair value of certain items of plant and equipment and land on the date of transition and designate the same as deemed cost as at April 01, 2015. For the remaining assets, the Company has applied Ind AS retrospectively, from the date of their acquisition. Also Refer note 55 on First time adoption of Ind AS.


Subsequent costs and disposal


Subsequent expenditure related to an item of property, plant and equipment is added to its book value only if it increases the future economic benefits from the existing asset beyond its previously assessed standard of performance/life. All other expenses on existing property, plant and equipment, including day-to-day repair and maintenance expenditure and cost of replacing parts, are charged to the statement of profit and loss for the period during which such expenses are incurred.


Gains and losses on disposal of an item of property, plant and equipment are determined by comparing the proceeds from disposal with the carrying amount of property, plant and equipment, and are recognized net within other income/other expenses in statement of profit and loss


(iv) Capital-work-in-progress


Assets in the course of construction are capitalized in capital work in progress account. At the point when an asset is capable of operating in the manner intended by management, the cost of construction is transferred to the appropriate category of property, plant and equipment. Costs (net of income) associated with the commissioning of an asset are capitalised until the period of commissioning has been completed and the asset is ready for its intended use.


(v) Depreciation, depletion and amortisation expense


Mining properties and other assets in the course of development or construction and freehold land are not depreciated.


Mining properties


The capitalised mining properties are amortised on a unit-of-production basis over the total estimated remaining commercial reserves of each property or group of properties and are subject to impairment review.


Oil and gas assets


All expenditures carried within each field are amortised from the commencement of production on a unit of production basis, which is the ratio of oil and gas production in the period to the estimated quantities of commercial reserves at the end of the period plus the production in the period, generally on a field-by-field basis or group of fields which are reliant on common infrastructure.


Commercial reserves are proven and probable oil and gas reserves, which are defined as the estimated quantities of crude oil, natural gas and natural gas liquids which geological, geophysical and engineering data demonstrate with a specified degree of certainty to be recoverable in future years from known reservoirs and which are considered commercially producible.


Costs used in the unit of production calculation comprise the net book value of capitalised costs plus the estimated future field development costs required to access commercial reserves. Changes in the estimates of commercial reserves or future field development costs are dealt with prospectively


Other assets


Depreciation on other property, plant and equipment is calculated using the straight-line method (SLM) to allocate their cost, net of their residual values, over their estimated useful lives (determined by the management based on technical estimates) or, in the case of certain leased assets, the shorter lease term as given below. The asset’s residual values and useful lives are reviewed, and adjusted if appropriate, at the end of each reporting period.


(e) Intangible assets


Intangible assets acquired separately are measured on initial recognition at cost. Following initial recognition, intangible assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortization and accumulated impairment losses, if a ny.


Intangible assets are amortised over their estimated useful life on a straight line basis. Software is amortised over the estimated useful life of software license of 5 years. Amounts paid for securing mining rights are amortised over the period of the mining lease of 20 years. The amortization period and the amortization method are reviewed at least at each financial year end. If the expected useful life of the asset is different from previous estimates, the change is accounted for prospectively as a change in accounting estimate.


(f) Exploration and evaluation intangible assets


Exploration and evaluation expenditure incurred after obtaining the mining right or the legal right to explore are capitalised as exploration and evaluation assets (intangible assets) and stated at cost less impairment. Exploration and evaluation assets are transferred to property, plant and equipment when the technical feasibility and commercial viability has been determined. Exploration and evaluation assets are assessed for impairment indicators atleast annually. Exploration and evaluation expenditure incurred prior to obtaining the mining right or the legal right to explore are expensed as incurred.


Exploration expenditure includes all direct and allocated indirect expenditure associated with finding specific mineral resources which includes depreciation and applicable operating costs of related support equipments and facilities and other costs of exploration activities:


Acquisition costs - costs associated with acquisition of licenses and rights to explore, including related professional fees.


General exploration costs - costs of surveys and studies, rights of access to properties to conduct those studies (e.g., costs incurred for environment clearance, defense clearance, etc.), and salaries and other expenses of geologists, geophysical crews and other personnel conducting those studies.


Costs of exploration drilling and equipping exploration and appraisal wells - Expenditure incurred on the acquisition of a license interest is initially capitalised on a license-by-license basis. Costs are held, undepleted, within exploration and evaluation assets until such time as the exploration phase on the license area is complete or commercial reserves have been discovered.


Exploration expenditure incurred in the process of determining oil and gas exploration targets is capitalised within “Exploration and evaluation assets” (intangible assets) and subsequently allocated to drilling activities. Exploration drilling costs are initially capitalised on a well-by-well basis until the success or otherwise of the well has been established. The success or failure of each exploration effort is judged on a well-by-well basis.


Following appraisal of successful exploration wells, if commercial reserves are established and technical feasibility for extraction demonstrated, then the related capitalised exploration costs are transferred into a single field cost center within property, plant and equipment - development/producing assets after testing for impairment. Where results of exploration drilling indicate the presence of hydrocarbons which are ultimately not considered commercially viable, all related costs are written off to profit or loss.


Net proceeds from any disposal of an exploration asset are initially credited against the previously capitalised costs. Any surplus proceeds are credited to the statement of profit and loss.


(g) Non-current assets held for sale


Non-current assets and disposal groups are classified as held for sale if their carrying amount will be recovered through a sale transaction rather than through continuing use. This condition is regarded as met only when the sale is highly probable and the asset (or disposal group) is available for immediate sale in its present condition. Management must be committed to the sale which should be expected to qualify for recognition as a completed sale within one year from the date of classification.


Non-current assets and disposal groups classified as held for sale are not depreciated and are measured at the lower of carrying amount and fair value less costs to sell. Such assets and disposal groups are presented separately on the face of the balance sheet.


(h) Impairment of non-financial assets


Impairment charges and reversals are assessed at the level of cash-generating units. A cash-generating unit (CGU) is the smallest identifiable group of assets that generate cash inflows that are largely independent of the cash inflows from other assets or group of assets.


The Company assess at each reporting date, whether there is an indication that an asset may be impaired. The Company conducts an internal review of asset values annually, which is used as a source of information to assess for any indications of impairment or reversal of previously recognised impairment losses. External factors, such as changes in expected future prices, costs and other market factors are also monitored to assess for indications of impairment or reversal of previously recognised impairment losses.


If any such indication exists then an impairment review is undertaken and the recoverable amount is calculated, as the higher of fair value less costs of disposal and the asset’s value in use.


Fair value less costs of disposal is the price that would be received to sell the asset in an orderly transaction between market participants and does not reflect the effects of factors that may be specific to the entity and not applicable to entities in general. Fair value for mineral and oil and gas assets is generally determined as the present value of the estimated future cash flows expected to arise from the continued use of the asset, including any expansion prospects, and its eventual disposal, using assumptions that an independent market participant may take into account. These cash flows are discounted at an appropriate post tax discount rate to arrive at the net present value.


Value in use is determined as the present value of the estimated future cash flows expected to arise from the continued use of the asset in its present form and its eventual disposal. The cash flows are discounted using a pre-tax discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the asset for which estimates of future cash flows have not been adjusted. Value in use is determined by applying assumptions specific to the company’s continued use and cannot take into account future development. These assumptions are different to those used in calculating fair value and consequently the value in use calculation is likely to give a different result to a fair value calculation.


The carrying amount of the CGU is determined on a basis consistent with the way the recoverable amount of the CGU is determined.


If the recoverable amount of an asset or CGU is estimated to be less than its carrying amount, the carrying amount of the asset or CGU is reduced to its recoverable amount. An impairment loss is recognised in the statement of profit and loss.


Any reversal of the previously recognised impairment loss is limited to the extent that the asset’s carrying amount does not exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined if no impairment loss had previously been recognised.


Exploration and evaluation assets:


In assessing whether there is any indication that an exploration and evaluation asset may be impaired, the company considers, as a minimum, the following indications:


- the period for which the entity has the right to explore in the specific area has expired during the period or will expire in the near future, and is not expected to be renewed;


- substantive expenditure on further exploration for and evaluation of mineral resources in the specific area is neither budgeted nor planned;


- exploration for and evaluation of mineral resources in the specific area have not led to the discovery of commercially viable quantities of mineral resources and the entity has decided to discontinue such activities in the specific area;


- sufficient data exist to indicate that, although a development in the specific area is likely to proceed, the carrying amount of the exploration and evaluation asset is unlikely to be recovered in full from successful development or by sale; and


- reserve information prepared annually by external experts.


When a potential impairment is identified, an assessment is performed for each area of interest in conjunction with the group of operating assets (representing a cash-generating unit) to which the exploration and evaluation assets is attributed. Exploration areas in which reserves have been discovered but require major capital expenditure before production can begin, are continually evaluated to ensure that commercial quantities of reserves exist or to ensure that additional exploration work is under way or planned. To the extent that capitalised expenditure is no longer expected to be recovered, it is charged to the statement of profit and loss.


(i) Financial instruments


A financial instrument is any contract that gives rise to a financial asset of one entity and a financial liability or equity instrument of another entity.


(i) Financial Assets - Recognition


All financial assets are recognised initially at fair value plus, in the case of financial assets not recorded at fair value through profit or loss, transaction costs that are attributable to the acquisition of the financial asset. Purchases or sales of financial assets that require delivery of assets within a time frame established by regulation or convention in the market place (regular way trades) are recognised on the trade date, i.e., the date that the Company commits to purchase or sell the asset.


For purposes of subsequent measurement, financial assets are classified in four categories:


- Debt instruments at amortised cost


A ‘debt instrument’ is measured at the amortised cost if both the following conditions are met:


a) The asset is held within a business model whose objective is to hold assets for collecting contractual cash flows, and


b) Contractual terms of the asset give rise on specified dates to cash flows that are solely payments of principal and interest (SPPI) on the principal amount outstanding.


After initial measurement, such financial assets are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest rate (EIR) method. Amortised cost is calculated by taking into account any discount or premium on acquisition and fees or costs that are an integral part of the EIR. The EIR amortisation is included in finance income in the profit or loss. The losses arising from impairment are recognised in the profit or loss.


- Debt instruments at fair value through other comprehensive income (FVOCI)


A ‘debt instrument’ is classified as FVOCI if both of the following criteria are met:


a) The objective of the business model is achieved both by collecting contractual cash flows and selling the financial assets, and


b) The asset’s contractual cash flows represent SPPI.


Debt instruments included within the FVOCI category are measured initially as well as at each reporting date at fair value. Fair value movements are recognized in the other comprehensive income (OCI). However, the interest income, impairment losses & reversals and foreign exchange gain or loss are recognised in the statement of profit and loss. On derecognition of the asset, cumulative gain or loss previously recognised in OCI is reclassified from the equity to profit or loss. Interest earned whilst holding FVOCI debt instrument is reported as interest income using the EIR method.


- Debt instruments at fair value through profit or loss (FVTPL)


FVTPL is a residual category for debt instruments. Any debt instrument, which does not meet the criteria for categorization as at amortized cost or as FVOCI, is classified as at FVTPL.


In addition, the Company may elect to designate a debt instrument, which otherwise meets amortized cost or


FVOCI criteria, as at FVTPL. However, such election is allowed only if doing so reduces or eliminates a measurement or recognition inconsistency (referred to as ‘accounting mismatch’). The Company has not designated any debt instrument as at FVTPL.


Debt instruments included within the FVTPL category are measured at fair value with all changes being recognized in profit or loss.


- Equity instruments


All equity investments in scope of Ind AS 109 are measured at fair value. Equity instruments which are held for trading and contingent consideration recognised by an acquirer in a business combination to which Ind AS 103 applies are classified as at FVTPL. For all other equity instruments, the Company may make an irrevocable election to present in other comprehensive income subsequent changes in the fair value. The Company makes such election on an instrument-by-instrument basis. The classification is made on initial recognition and is irrevocable.


If the Company decides to classify an equity instrument as at FVOCI, then all fair value changes on the instrument, excluding dividends, are recognized in OCI. There is no recycling of the amounts from OCI to the statement of profit or loss, even on sale of investment. However, the Company may transfer the cumulative gain or loss within equity. For equity instruments which are classified as FVTPL all subsequent fair value changes are recognised in the statement of profit and loss.


(ii) Financial Assets - derecognition


The Company derecognises a financial asset when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the asset expire, or it transfers the rights to receive the contractual cash flows on the financial asset in a transaction in which substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership of the financial asset are transferred.


(iii) Impairment of financial assets


In accordance with Ind AS 109, the Company applies expected credit loss (ECL) model for measurement and recognition of impairment loss on the following financial assets:


- Financial assets that are debt instruments, and are measured at amortised cost e.g., loans, debt securities and deposits


- Financial assets that are debt instruments and are measured as at FVOCI


-Trade receivables or any contractual right to receive cash or another financial asset that result from transactions that are within the scope of Ind AS 18


The Company follows ‘simplified approach’ for recognition of impairment loss allowance on trade receivables.


The application of simplified approach does not require the Company to track changes in credit risk. Rather, it recognises impairment loss allowance based on lifetime ECLs at each reporting date, right from its initial recognition.


At each reporting date, for recognition of impairment loss on other financial assets and risk exposure, the Company determines that whether there has been a significant increase in the credit risk since initial recognition. If credit risk has not increased significantly, 12-month ECL is used to provide for impairment loss. However, if credit risk has increased significantly, lifetime ECL is used. If, in a subsequent period, credit quality of the instrument improves such that there is no longer a significant increase in credit risk since initial recognition, then the entity reverts to recognising impairment loss allowance based on 12-month ECL.


Lifetime ECL are the expected credit losses resulting from all possible default events over the expected life of a financial instrument. The 12-month ECL is a portion of the lifetime ECL which results from default events that are possible within 12 months after the reporting date


ECL is the difference between all contractual cash flows that are due to the company in accordance with the contract and all the cash flows that the entity expects to receive (i.e., all cash shortfalls), discounted at the original EIR.


ECL impairment loss allowance (or reversal) recognized during the year is recognized as income/ expense in the statement of profit or loss. The balance sheet presentation for various financial instruments is described below:


- Financial assets measured at amortised cost: ECL is presented as an allowance, i.e., as an integral part of the measurement of those assets in the balance sheet. Until the asset meets write-off criteria, the Company does not reduce impairment allowance from the gross carrying amount.


- Debt instruments measured at FVOCI: Since financial assets are already reflected at fair value, impairment allowance is not further reduced from its value. Rather, ECL amount is presented as ‘accumulated impairment amount’ in the OCI.


For assessing increase in credit risk and impairment loss, the Company combines financial instruments on the basis of shared credit risk characteristics with the objective of facilitating an analysis that is designed to enable significant increases in credit risk to be identified on a timely basis.


The Company does not have any purchased or originated credit-impaired (POCI) financial assets, i.e., financial assets which are credit impaired on purchase/ origination.


(iv) Financial liabilities - Recognition & Subsequent measurement


Financial liabilities are classified, at initial recognition, as financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss, or as loans, borrowings and payables, or as derivatives designated as hedging instruments in an effective hedge, as appropriate.


All financial liabilities are recognised initially at fair value and, in the case of financial liabilities at amortised cost, net of directly attributable transaction costs.


The Company’s financial liabilities include trade and other payables and borrowings including bank overdrafts and derivative financial instruments.


The subsequent measurement of financial liabilities depends on their classification, as described below:


- Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss


Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss include financial liabilities held for trading and financial liabilities designated upon initial recognition as at fair value through profit or loss. Financial liabilities are classified as held for trading if they are incurred for the purpose of repurchasing in the near term. This category also includes derivative financial instruments entered into by the Company that are not designated as hedging instruments in hedge relationships as defined by Ind AS 109. Separated embedded derivatives are also classified as held for trading unless they are designated as effective hedging instruments.


Gains or losses on liabilities held for trading are recognised in profit or loss.


Financial liabilities designated upon initial recognition at fair value through profit or loss are designated as such at the initial date of recognition, and only if the criteria in Ind AS 109 are satisfied. For liabilities designated as FVTPL, fair value gains/ losses attributable to changes in own credit risk are recognized in OCI. These gains/ loss are not subsequently transferred to profit or loss. However, the Company may transfer the cumulative gain or loss within equity. All other changes in fair value of such liability are recognised in the statement of profit or loss. The Company has not designated any financial liability as at fair value through profit and loss.


- Financial liabilities at amortised cost (Loans & Borrowings)


After initial recognition, interest-bearing loans and borrowings are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the EIR method. Gains and losses are recognised in profit or loss when the liabilities are derecognised as well as through the EIR amortisation process.


Amortised cost is calculated by taking into account any discount or premium on acquisition and fees or costs that are an integral part of the EIR. The EIR amortisation is included as finance costs in profit or loss.


(v) Financial liabilities - Derecognition


A financial liability is derecognised when the obligation under the liability is discharged or cancelled or expires. When an existing financial liability is replaced by another from the same lender on substantially different terms, or the terms of an existing liability are substantially modified, such an exchange or modification is treated as the derecognition of the original liability and the recognition of a new liability. The difference in the respective carrying amounts is recognised in the statement of profit and loss.


(vi) Embedded derivatives


An embedded derivative is a component of a hybrid (combined) instrument that also includes a non-derivative host contract - with the effect that some of the cash flows of the combined instrument vary in a way similar to a stand-alone derivative. An embedded derivative causes some or all of the cash flows that otherwise would be required by the contract to be modified according to a specified interest rate, financial instrument price, commodity price, foreign exchange rate, index of prices or rates, credit rating or credit index, or other variable, provided in the case of a non-financial variable that the variable is not specific to a party to the contract. Reassessment only occurs if there is either a change in the terms of the contract that significantly modifies the cash flows that would otherwise be required or a reclassification of a financial asset out of the fair value through profit or loss.


If the hybrid contract contains a host that is a financial asset within the scope of Ind AS 109, the Company does not separate embedded derivatives. Rather, it applies the classification requirements contained in Ind AS 109 to the entire hybrid contract. Derivatives embedded in all other host contracts are accounted for as separate derivatives and recorded at fair value if their economic characteristics and risks are not closely related to those of the host contracts and the host contracts are not held for trading or designated at fair value though profit or loss. These embedded derivatives are measured at fair value with changes in fair value recognised in profit or loss, unless designated as effective hedging instruments.


(vii) Equity instruments


An equity instrument is any contract that evidences a residual interest in the assets of any entity after deducting all of its liabilities. Equity instruments issued by the Company are recognised at the proceeds received, net of direct issue costs.


(viii) Offsetting of financial instruments


Financial assets and financial liabilities are offset and the net amount is reported in the balance sheet if there is a currently enforceable legal right to offset the recognised amounts and there is an intention to settle on a net basis, or to realise the asset and settle the liability simultaneously.


(ix) Derivative financial instruments and hedge accounting


Initial recognition and subsequent measurement


In order to hedge its exposure to foreign exchange, interest rate, and commodity price risks, the Company enters into forward, option, swap contracts and other derivative financial instruments. The Company does not hold derivative financial instruments for speculative purposes.


Such derivative financial instruments are initially recognised at fair value on the date on which a derivative contract is entered into and are subsequently re-measured at fair value. Derivatives are carried as financial assets when the fair value is positive and as financial liabilities when the fair value is negative.


Any gains or losses arising from changes in the fair value of derivatives are taken directly to profit or loss, except for the effective portion of cash flow hedges, which is recognised in OCI and later reclassified to profit or loss when the hedge item affects profit or loss or treated as basis adjustment if a hedged forecast transaction subsequently results in the recognition of a non-financial asset or non-financial liability.


For the purpose of hedge accounting, hedges are classified as:


- Fair value hedges when hedging the exposure to changes in the fair value of a recognised asset or liability or an unrecognised firm commitment


- Cash flow hedges when hedging the exposure to variability in cash flows that is either attributable to a particular risk associated with a recognised asset or liability or a highly probable forecast transaction or the foreign currency risk in an unrecognised firm commitment


- Hedges of a net investment in a foreign operation


At the inception of a hedge relationship, the Company formally designates and documents the hedge relationship to which the Company wishes to apply hedge accounting and the risk management objective and strategy for undertaking the hedge. The documentation includes the Company’s risk management objective and strategy for undertaking hedge, the hedging/ economic relationship, the hedged item or transaction, the nature of the risk being hedged, hedge ratio and how the entity will assess the effectiveness of changes in the hedging instrument’s fair value in offsetting the exposure to changes in the hedged item’s fair value or cash flows attributable to the hedged risk. Such hedges are expected to be highly effective in achieving offsetting changes in fair value or cash flows and are assessed on an ongoing basis to determine that they actually have been highly effective throughout the financial reporting periods for which they were designated.


Hedges that meet the strict criteria for hedge accounting are accounted for, as described below:


i. Fair value hedges


Changes in the fair value of derivatives that are designated and qualify as fair value hedges are recognised in profit or loss immediately, together with any changes in the fair value of the hedged asset or liability that are attributable to the hedged risk.


When an unrecognised firm commitment is designated as a hedged item, the subsequent cumulative change in the fair value of the firm commitment attributable to the hedged risk is recognised as an asset or liability with a corresponding gain or loss recognised in profit or loss. Hedge accounting is discontinued when the company revokes the hedge relationship, the hedging instrument or hedged item expires or is sold, terminated, or exercised or no longer meets the criteria for hedge accounting.


ii. Cash flow hedges


The effective portion of the gain or loss on the hedging instrument is recognised in OCI in the cash flow hedge reserve, while any ineffective portion is recognised immediately in profit or loss.


Amounts recognised as OCI are transferred to profit or loss when the hedged transaction affects profit or loss, such as when the hedged financial income or financial expense is recognised or when a forecast sale occurs when the hedged item is the cost of a non-financial asset or non-financial liability, the amounts recognised as OCI are transferred to the initial carrying amount of the non-financial asset or liability.


If the hedging instrument expires or is sold, terminated or exercised without replacement or rollover (as part of the hedging strategy), or if its designation as a hedge is revoked, or when the hedge no longer meets the criteria for hedge accounting, any cumulative gain or loss previously recognised in OCI remains separately in equity until the forecast transaction occurs or the foreign currency firm commitment is met.


(j) Financial guarantees


Financial guarantees issued by the Company on behalf of group companies are designated as ‘Insurance Contracts’. The Company assess at the end of each reporting period whether its recognised insurance liabilities (if any) are adequate, using current estimates of future cash flows under its insurance contracts. If that assessment shows that the carrying amount of its insurance liabilities is inadequate in the light of the estimated future cash flows, the entire deficiency is recognised in profit or loss.


(k) Borrowing costs


Borrowing cost includes interest expense as per Effective Interest Rate (EIR) and exchange differences arising from foreign currency borrowings to the extent they are regarded as an adjustment to the interest cost.


Borrowing costs directly relating to the acquisition, construction or production of a qualifying capital project under construction are capitalised and added to the project cost during construction until such time that the assets are substantially ready for their intended use i.e. when they are capable of commercial production. Where funds are borrowed specifically to finance a project, the amount capitalised represents the actual borrowing costs incurred. Where surplus funds are available out of money borrowed specifically to finance a project, the income generated from such current investments is deducted from the total capitalized borrowing cost. Where the funds used to finance a project form part of general borrowings, the amount capitalised is calculated using a weighted average of rates applicable to relevant general borrowings of the company during the year. Capitalisation of borrowing costs is suspended and charged to profit and loss during the extended periods when the active development on the qualifying assets is interrupted.


EIR is the rate that exactly discounts the estimated future cash payments or receipts over the expected life of the financial liability or a shorter period, where appropriate, to the amortised cost of a financial liability. When calculating the effective interest rate, the Company estimates the expected cash flows by considering all the contractual terms of the financial instrument (for example, prepayment, extension, call and similar options).


(l) Buyers’ Credit


The Company enters into arrangements whereby financial institutions make direct payments to suppliers for raw materials and project materials. The financial institutions are subsequently repaid by the company at a later date providing working capital timing benefits. These are normally settled up to twelve months (for raw materials) and up to 36 months (for project materials). Where these arrangements are for raw materials with a maturity of up to twelve months, the economic substance of the transaction is determined to be operating in nature and these are recognised as operational buyers’ credit (under Trade and other payables). Where these arrangements are for project materials with a maturity up to thirty six months, the economic substance of the transaction is determined to be financing in nature, and these are classified as projects buyers’ credit within borrowings in the statement of financial position.


(m) Leases


Determining whether an arrangement contains lease


At inception of an arrangement, the Company determines whether the arrangement is or contains a lease. The arrangement is, or contains, a lease if fulfilment of the arrangement is dependent on the use of a specific asset or assets and the arrangement conveys a right to use the asset or assets, even if that right is not explicitly specified in an arrangement.


Arrangements containing a lease have been evaluated as on the date of transition i.e. April 01, 2015 in accordance with Ind-AS 101 First-time Adoption of Indian Accounting Standard. Lease arrangements including both land and building have been separately evaluated for finance or operating lease at the date of transition to Ind ASs basis the facts and circumstances existing as at that date. Also, Refer note 55 on first time adoption of Ind AS for the related transition provisions.


At inception or on reassessment of an arrangement that contains lease, the Company separates payments and other consideration required by the arrangement into those for the lease and those for other elements on the basis of their relative fair values. If the Company concludes for a finance lease that is impracticable to separate the payments reliably, then an asset and a liability are recognised at an amount equal to the fair value of the underlying asset; subsequently the liability is reduced as payments are made and an imputed finance cost on the liability is recognised using the Company’s incremental borrowing rate.


Company as a lessee


A lease is classified at the inception date as a finance lease or an operating lease. A lease that transfers substantially all the risks and rewards incidental to ownership to the Company is classified as a finance lease.


Finance leases are capitalised at the commencement of the lease at the inception date fair value of the leased property or, if lower, at the present value of the minimum lease payments. Lease payments are apportioned between finance charges and reduction of the lease liability so as to achieve a constant rate of interest on the remaining balance of the liability. Finance charges are recognised in finance costs in the statement of profit and loss, unless they are directly attributable to qualifying assets, in which case they are capitalized in accordance with the Company’s general policy on the borrowing costs. Contingent rentals are recognised as expenses in the periods in which they are incurred.


A leased asset is depreciated over the useful life of the asset. However, if there is no reasonable certainty that the Company will obtain ownership by the end of the lease term, the asset is depreciated over the shorter of the estimated useful life of the asset and the lease term.


Operating lease payments are recognised as an expense in the statement of profit and loss on a straight-line basis over the lease term. Unless the payments are structured to increase in line with general inflation to compensate for the lessor’s expected inflationary cost increase.


Company as a lessor


Leases in which the Company does not transfer substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership of an asset are classified as operating leases. Rental income from operating lease is recognised on a straight-line basis over the term of the relevant lease. Initial direct costs incurred in negotiating and arranging an operating lease are added to the carrying amount of the leased asset and recognised over the lease term on the same basis as rental income. Contingent rents are recognised as revenue in the period in which they are earned.


Leases are classified as finance leases when substantially all of the risks and rewards of ownership transfer from the Company to the lessee. Amounts due from lessees under finance leases are recorded as receivables at the Company’s net investment in the leases. Finance lease income is allocated to accounting periods so as to reflect a constant periodic rate of return on the net investment outstanding in respect of the lease.


(n) Inventories


Inventories including work-in-progress are stated at the lower of cost and net realisable value, less any provision for obsolescence. Cost is determined on the following basis:


- purchased copper concentrate and stores and spares relating to oil and gas business are recorded at cost on a first-in, first-out (“FIFO”) basis; all other materials including stores and spares are valued on a weighted average basis;


- finished products are valued at raw material cost plus costs of conversion, comprising labor costs and an attributable proportion of manufacturing overheads based on normal levels of activity and are moved out of inventory on a FIFO basis. However finished goods of oil and condesate is determined on a quarterly weighted average basis; and


- By-products and scrap are valued at net realisable value.


Net realisable value is determined based on estimated selling price, less further costs expected to be incurred to completion and disposal.


(o) Government Grant


Grants and subsidies from the government are recognised when there is reasonable assurance that (i) the Company will comply with the conditions attached to them, and (ii) the grant/subsidy will be received.


When the grant or subsidy relates to revenue, it is recognised as income on a systematic basis in profit or loss over the periods necessary to match them with the related costs, which they are intended to compensate


Where the grant relates to an asset, it is recognised as deferred income and released to income in equal amounts over the expected useful life of the related asset and presented within other income.


When the Company receives grants of non-monetary assets, the asset and the grant are recorded at fair value amounts and released to profit or loss over the expected useful life in a pattern of consumption of the benefit of the underlying asset.


When loans or similar assistance are provided by governments or related institutions, with an interest rate below the current applicable market rate, the effect of this favorable interest is regarded as a government grant. The loan or assistance is initially recognised and measured at fair value and the government grant is measured as the difference between the initial carrying value of the loan and the proceeds received. The loan is subsequently measured as per the accounting policy applicable to financial liabilities.


(p) Taxation


Tax expense represents the sum of current tax and deferred tax.


Current tax is provided at amounts expected to be paid (or recovered) using the tax rates and laws that have been enacted or substantively enacted by the reporting date and includes any adjustment to tax payable in respect of previous years.


Subject to exceptions below, deferred tax is provided, using the balance sheet method, on all deductible temporary differences at the reporting date between the tax bases of assets and liabilities and their carrying amounts for financial reporting purposes, on carry forward of unused tax credits and unused tax loss;


* deferred income tax is not recognised on the initial recognition (including MAT) of an asset or liability in a transaction that is not a business combination and, at the time of the transaction, affects neither the accounting profit nor taxable profit or loss; and


* deferred tax assets are recognised only to the extent that it is more likely than not that they will be recovered.


Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured at the tax rates that are expected to apply to the year when the asset is realized or the liability is settled, based on tax rates (and tax laws) that have been enacted or substantively enacted at the reporting date. Tax relating to items recognized outside profit or loss is recognised outside profit or loss (either in other comprehensive income or equity).


The carrying amount of deferred tax assets (including MAT credit available) is reviewed at each reporting date and is adjusted to the extent that it is no longer probable that sufficient taxable profit will be available to allow all or part of the asset to be recovered.


Deferred tax assets and liabilities are offset when they relate to income taxes levied by the same taxation authority and the Company intends to settle its current tax assets and liabilities on a net basis.


(q) Retirement benefits schemes


The Company operates or participates in a number of defined benefits and defined contribution schemes, the assets of which (where funded) are held in separately administered funds. For defined benefit pension schemes, the cost of providing benefits under the plans is determined by actuarial valuation separately for each plan using the projected unit credit method by independent qualified actuaries as at the year end.


Remeasurements including, effects of asset ceiling and return on plan asets (excluding amounts including in interest on the net defined benefit liability) and actuarial gains and losses arising in the year are recognised in full in other comprehensive income and are not recycled to the profit or loss. For defined contribution schemes, the amount charged to the statements of profit or loss in respect of pension costs and other post retirement benefits is the contributions payable in the year, recognised as and when the employee renders related services.


Past service costs are recognised in profit or loss on the earlier of:


- The date of the plan amendment or curtailment, and


-The date that the Company recognises related restructuring costs


Net interest is calculated by applying the discount rate to the net defined benefit liability or asset. The Company recognises the following changes in the net defined benefit obligation as an expense in the consolidated statement of profit and loss:


- Service costs comprising current service costs, past-service costs, gains and losses on curtailments and non-routine settlements; and


- Net interest expense or income.


(r) Share-based payments


Certain employees (including executive directors) of the company receive part of their remuneration in the form of share-based payment transactions, whereby employees render services in exchange for shares or rights over shares (‘equity-settled transactions’).


The resultant increase in equity is recorded in share based payment reserve.


The cost of equity-settled transactions with employees is measured at fair value at the date at which they are granted. The fair value of share awards with market-related vesting conditions are determined with the assistance of an external valuer and the fair value at the grant date is expensed on a proportionate basis over the vesting period based on the Company’s estimate of shares that will eventually vest. The estimate of the number of awards likely to vest is reviewed at each balance sheet date up to the vesting date at which point the estimate is adjusted to reflect the current expectations. Amounts recharged to subsidiaries in respect of awards granted to employees of subsidiaries are recognised as intercompany debtors until repaid.


In case of cash-settled transactions, a liability is recognised for the fair value of cash-settled transactions. The fair value is measured initially and at each reporting date up to and including the settlement date, with changes in fair value recognised in employee benefits expense. The fair value is expensed over the period until the vesting date with recognition of a corresponding liability. The fair value is determined with the assistance of an external valuer.


(s) Provisions, contingent liabilities and contingent assets


Provisions represent liabilities for which the amount or timing is uncertain. Provisions are recognized when the Company has a present obligation (legal or constructive), as a result of past events, and it is probable that an outflow of resources, that can be reliably estimated, will be required to settle such an obligation.


If the effect of the time value of money is material, provisions are determined by discounting the expected future cash flows to net present value using an appropriate pre-tax discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and, where appropriate, the risks specific to the liability. Unwinding of the discount is recognized in profit or loss as a finance cost. Provisions are reviewed at each reporting date and are adjusted to reflect the current best estimate.


A contingent liability is a possible obligation that arises from past events whose existence will be confirmed by the occurrence or non-occurrence of one or more uncertain future events beyond the control of the Company or a present obligation that is not recognised because it is not probable that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation. A contingent liability also arises in extremely rare cases where there is a liability that cannot be recognised because it cannot be measured reliably. The Company does not recognize a contingent liability but discloses its existence in the financial statements.


Contingent assets are not recognised but disclosed in the financial statements when an inflow of economic benefits is probable.


(t) Restoration, rehabilitation and environmental costs


An obligation to incur restoration, rehabilitation and environmental costs arises when environmental disturbance is caused by the development or ongoing production of a mine or oil fields. Such costs, discounted to net present value, are provided for and a corresponding amount is capitalised at the start of each project, as soon as the obligation to incur such costs arises. These costs are charged to profit or loss over the life of the operation thr

CIN: U67190WB2003PTC096617. Trading in Commodities is done through our Group Company Dynamic Commodities Pvt. Ltd. The company is also engaged in Proprietory Trading apart from Client Business.
“2019 © COPYRIGHT DYNAMIC EQUITIES PVT. LTD.”

Disclaimer: There is no guarantee of profits or no exceptions from losses. The investment advice provided are solely the personal views of the research team. You are advised to rely on your own judgment while making investment / Trading decisions. Past performance is not an indicator of future returns. Investment is subject to market risks. You should read and understand the Risk Disclosure Documents before trading/Investing.

Disclosure: We, Dynamic Equities Private Limited are also engaged in Proprietory Trading apart from Client Business. In case of any complaints/grievances, clients may write to us at compliance@dynamiclevels.com

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